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In the year-long course, students in Grade 11 develop English concepts and skills by applying the essential question:  What does it mean to be an adult?  Students analyze literary elements in a variety of genres and use techniques of research and technology to produce and present oral and written communications.  English 11 prepares students to take the P/SAT and the Advanced Placement Language and Composition course, or the Advanced Placement Literature and Composition course in grade 12.
The curriculum uses the works listed below because of their literary merit.  Although some works may contain strong language and/or sophisticated themes, they develop the powerful ideas of great literature and illuminate classical themes in a contemporary context.  Their study in the high school English classroom, therefore, enables students to apply critical thinking processes to realistic issues encountered in the world and in widespread contemporary cultures, and to understand and appreciate mature literature in order to enrich and extend the experiences of their lives.  We encourage parents to participate fully in their adolescents’ education, to read along with them, and to discuss literature together as they emerge into adulthood.
 Program Outcomes
 By the end of the course, students will perform these English Core Learning Goals and those of the American Diploma Project with proficiency:
·      Respond to a text by employing personal experiences and critical analysis;
·      Compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose;
·      Control language by applying the conventions of standard English in writing and speaking;
·      Evaluate the content, organization, and language of texts
Units 1 and 2:  What does it mean to be an adult?
Basic Texts:  The Great Gatsby,  F. Scott Fitzgerald (in all units) Self-Selected Texts
Students apply and extend strategies for
·      Reading fiction focusing on narrative elements and language;
·      Analyzing the use of rhetorical appeals; presenting a persuasive speech;
·      Writing to explain, to relate a story and to persuade;
·      Analyzing language to refine understanding of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax.
·      Researching self-selected topics and writing a multi-genre research paper.
 Units 3 and 4:  What does it mean to be an adult?
 Basic Texts:  The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck Death of a Salesman, Arthur Miller
Students apply and extend strategies for
·      Reading fiction and drama focusing on structure and thematic issues;
·      Preparing and presenting a policy debate;
·      Writing a literary analysis of an author’s works;
·      Analyzing language to refine understanding of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax.